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John Abraham’s Autographed Jersey on Auction Block for Animals

Written by PETA

Posted 02-04-2016, 09:41 AM

One of Bollywood’s hottest leading men, John Abraham, has a heart as big as his sex appeal – for proof, just look at the jersey for his team, NorthEast United FC, that the star signed and donated to be auctioned. Proceeds will go to Animal Rahat, a non-profit group that provides animals who are forced to work with veterinary care and other relief. The auction is live on eBay.

“The bulls, donkeys, horses and other animals who pull heavy loads day in and day out are in desperate need of care”, says Abraham. “I couldn’t be more pleased that this jersey will go to support Animal Rahat’s tireless efforts to help these animals.”

John Abraham's Jersey (2)

This isn’t the first time Abraham has helped animals. He previously called on the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change to make all circuses in India animal-free and starred in an ad that called on everyone to let birds be free – not caged.

PETA India supports Animal Rahat, which was founded in 2003 to give relief to horses, bullocks, donkeys and other animals.

Animal Rahat’s team of veterinarians, veterinary assistants, animal caretakers and community educators are on call around the clock every day of the year, offering services throughout three districts in Maharashtra. Some of the group’s accomplishments include conducting vaccination camps, stopping cruel bullock races and confiscating countless whips, nose ropes, barbed-wire goads, horn-paring equipment and other inhumane devices that add misery to the lives of animals used for work.

NEUFC Jersey Autographed by Bollywood Actor John Abraham

FAQ on Jallikattu, Bull Races and PETA India

Written by PETA

Posted 01-16-2016, 09:52 AM

We’ve received many inquiries from Facebook and Twitter followers lately, so this blog post aims to answer some of the most frequently asked questions.

Why is PETA India against jallikattu, bull races and other such events?

Jallikattu exploits bulls’ natural nervousness as prey animals by deliberately placing them in a terrifying situation in which they are forced to run away from those they perceive as predators. As PETA India has documented in Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI)–authorised inspections, the bulls become so frightened by the mob of men who participate that they slip, fall, run into barriers and traffic – and even jump off cliffs in their desperate attempts to escape – frequently leading to broken bones or death.

As can be seen in the documentation, jallikattu participants purposely disorient the bulls by forcing them to consume alcohol; twist and bite their tails; stab and jab them with sickles, spears, knives and sticks; cause them intense pain by yanking their nose ropes; and punch them, jump on them and drag them to the ground.

PETA India has also documented that during races, bulls run because people hurt them. They’re hit with everything from bare hands to nail-studded sticks, and their tailbones are broken at each joint. This is as painful to the bulls as it would be to us if someone were to break our fingers joint by joint.

In bullfights, the round ends when one of the frightened and injured bulls manages to flee – or is killed.

Participants and spectators are also at risk. From 2010 to 2014, media outlets reported that there were some 1,100 human injuries and 17 deaths caused by jallikattu-style events, including the death of a child. The actual number is probably higher since many injuries likely weren’t reported in the news.

Why has PETA India targeted only jallikattu?

We are targeting all cruelty to animals, not just jallikattu. A 7 July 2011 notification in The Gazette of India made using bulls as performing animals illegal. This applies to jallikattu, kambala, bull races, bullfights and other uses of bulls for performances.

In its 7 May 2014 judgement, the Honourable Supreme Court confirmed this ban on the use of bulls for performances. The court also ruled that cruelty is inherent in these events, as bulls are not anatomically suited to them. It observed that forcing bulls to participate subjects them to unnecessary pain and suffering, so it ruled that such races are not permitted by law.

Jallikattu, bull races and other similar events also violate the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (PCA) Act, 1960. This means the causing of unnecessary suffering to bulls which is inherent in these events has been illegal for 56 years.

Section 77 of the 7 May 2014 Supreme Court judgement says, “77. We, therefore, hold that AWBI is right in its stand that Jallikattu, Bullock-cart Race and such events per se violate

Sections 3, 11(1)(a) and 11(1)(m)(ii) of PCA Act and hence we uphold the notification dated 11.7.2011 issued by the Central Government, consequently, Bulls cannot be used as performing animals, either for the Jallikattu events or Bullock-cart Races in the

State of Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra or elsewhere in the country”.

Section 3, 11(1)(a) of the PCA Act, 1960, makes it illegal if any person “beats, kicks, over-rides, over-drives, over-loads, tortures or otherwise treats any animal so as to subject it to unnecessary pain or suffering or causes, or being the owner permits, any animal to be so treated”. Section 11(1)(m)(ii) of the PCA Act, 1960, makes it illegal if any person “confines or causes to be confined any animal (including tying of an animal as a bait in a tiger or other sanctuary) so as to make it an object or prey for any other animal”.

The Supreme Court clarified, “Fight can be with an animal or a human being”. Its order said, “Section 5 of TNRJ Act envisages a fight between a Bull and Bull tamers, that is, Bull tamer

has to fight with the bull and tame it. Such fight is prohibited under Section 11(1)(m)(ii) of PCA Act read with Section 3 of the Act”.

The Tamil Nadu Regulation of Jallikattu (TNRJ) Act was struck down by the Supreme Court because it was “inconsistent and in direct collision with Section 3, Section 11(1)(a), 11(1)(m)(ii) and Section 22 of the PCA Act read with Articles 51A(g) & (h) of the Constitution and hence repugnant to the PCA Act”.

Furthermore, Section 429 of the Indian Penal Code reads, “429. Mischief by killing or maiming cattle, etc., of any value or any animal of the value of fifty rupees.—Whoever commits mis­chief by killing, poisoning, maiming or rendering useless, any elephant, camel, horse, mule, buffalo, bull, cow or ox, whatever may be the value thereof, or any other animal of the value of fifty rupees or upwards, shall be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to five years, or with fine, or with both”.

What about the argument that jallikattu should be allowed because it’s part of India’s culture or tradition or has religious significance?

Countless Tamilian PETA India supporters are against jallikattu and are saddened by those who call harming bulls Tamil “culture”. India’s culture is one of kindness, not cruelty. Article 51A(g) of the Indian Constitution makes it the mandate of every Indian citizen “to protect and improve the natural environment including forests, lakes, rivers and wild life, and to have compassion for living creatures”.

Section 42 of the 7 May 2014 Supreme Court judgement says, “The Statement of Objects and Reasons of the TNRJ Act refers to ancient culture and tradition and does not state that it has any religious significance. Even the ancient culture and tradition do not support the conduct of Jallikattu or Bullock cart race, in the form in which they are being conducted at present. Welfare and the well-being of the bull is Tamil culture and tradition, they do not

approve of infliction of any pain or suffering on the bulls, on the other hand, Tamil tradition and culture are to worship the bull and the bull is always considered as the vehicle of Lord Shiva. Yeru Thazhuvu, in Tamil tradition, is to embrace bulls and not overpowering

the bull, to show human bravery”. It concluded, “Jallikattu or the bullock cart race, as practised now, has never been the tradition or culture of Tamil Nadu”.

Section 43 of the same judgement reads, “PCA Act, a welfare legislation, in our view, over-shadows or overrides the so-called tradition and culture. Jallikattu and Bullock

cart races, the manner in which they are conducted, have no support of Tamil tradition or culture. Assuming, it has been in vogue for quite some time, in our view, the same should give way to the welfare legislation, like the PCA Act which has been enacted to prevent infliction of unnecessary pain or suffering on animals and confer duties and obligations on persons in-charge of animals”.

In any case, history is simply never a good excuse for continuing abuse, and we have the ability to have independent thought, demonstrate empathy and apply reason to make autonomous decisions. For example, many people who grew up in meat-eating cultures have chosen to eat vegan after learning how animals suffer in the production of meat, eggs and dairy foods. We can choose how to live our lives and to celebrate holidays in ways which cause others no harm. We do not need to have our actions dictated by society or what happened in the past, especially if conforming to traditional norms would mean abusing another living, breathing, thinking individual.

Furthermore, Hindus commonly worship bulls in temples honouring Lord Shiva by gently touching the forehead of Nandi’s idol. If some miscreants were to enter Lord Shiva’s temple and desecrate Nandi’s idol, people would not stand for it. Then why support abuse of real-life bulls of Lord Shiva?

Some say if bulls are not used for jallikattu, they will be sold to slaughter.

The Indian Express reported in a 12 January article titled “Explained: In Jallikattu, Questions of Tradition and Cruelty to Animals” that “no tickets are sold for Jallikattu or bullock-cart races”. It further states, “Jallikattu events do not offer any major monetary benefits, and prizes are mostly a dhoti, towel, betel leaves, bananas and token cash – that is rarely more than Rs 101 – on a silver plate. Mixer-grinders, refrigerators and furniture have been added to the list of prizes at some events over the last few years”.

If there’s essentially no monetary benefit to the farmer and no tickets are sold, then the farmers aren’t financially worse off with a ban on jallikattu and should have no increased incentive to sell their bulls to slaughter.

The Times of India quoted Dhana Kumar, a resident of Manickampatti near Palamedu in Madurai district, as saying, “I have two children, but I love my bull Karuppasamy more. I have caned my children, but not my bull. Usually the jallikattu bulls are pledged to God and we consider them sacred”. If the bulls are considered sacred, surely selling them to slaughter shouldn’t even be considered.

Slaughter isn’t the only suffering that the bulls face. There are many different types of cruelty, and they’re all wrong to commit. However, although they shouldn’t be, bulls do end up at the slaughterhouse when they are injured in training or during jallikattu – which happens often – or when they’re deemed no longer useful. Bulls have also died during the events themselves, including this one who ran directly into a bus in his panic.

Some say banning jallikattu will eliminate native breeds of cattle.

Cattle breeds in India have been changing for many years because of a variety of factors, even during the decades when jallikattu was allowed, so to claim this change is primarily a result of banning jallikattu is preposterous. Cattle breeds are largely manipulated by humans to suit their own “needs” – such as increased milk production. Changes in breed don’t mean the extinction of a species. Domesticated cattle are not at risk of being on the endangered species list.

It’s said by those who make this argument that “stud bulls” are reared by people for jallikattu. The ones who win jallikattu are in greater demand for impregnating cows. However, an end to jallikattu does not stop bulls from being used for this purpose. It’s said that small farmers can’t afford to keep stud bulls, so each village has a common temple bull who is used for impregnating the cows of the village. However, since there’s essentially no monetary benefit from jallikattu, this can still continue. In addition, a veterinarian would be able to inform villagers which bull is healthy much better than the outcome of a jallikattu event could.

Furthermore, while some bulls are used for jallikattu, others are used as draught animals in transport and farming – a practice which could easily continue without jallikattu.

The community can come up with ways that genuinely honour these bulls and that keep the animals in their lives without the cruelty that’s been deemed unacceptable by the Supreme Court.

I’ve heard that PETA India paid crores of rupees to a lawyer to fight the case in the Supreme Court. Is that true?

No. PETA India uses top lawyers who work for us on a pro-bono basis – or at a significantly reduced cost – for various cases. We don’t have crores to spend on a lawyer. We’re a non-profit organisation.

 I’ve heard rumours that PETA India simply wants to promote foreign breeds of cattle. Is that true?

What a complicated, bizarre, inept plan it would be if it were true!

PETA India is an animal rights organisation, and our motto is, in part, “animals are not ours to eat”. We advocate a vegan lifestyle, which means we have no interest in promoting foreign breeds of cattle for meat or dairy production, and in fact, we actively campaign against the meat and dairy industries because of their inherent cruelty.

Why doesn’t PETA India focus on some other issue instead?

We focus on many issues, but cruelty to bulls for events like jallikattu, bull races and bullfighting is serious and cannot be ignored.

Why doesn’t PETA India ban slaughterhouses?

PETA India doesn’t have that power, and the courts can only uphold existing laws.

PETA India currently has a case in the Supreme Court with state governments as respondents alleging that unlawful cruelty is common in the transport and slaughter of animals. The court has urged all states to crack down on unlicensed slaughterhouses as a result and to form law-enforcement committees.

That said, even if laws were enforced, they still permit most animals to be killed. That’s why we encourage the public to help stop the slaughter of animals by going vegan, including by refusing to wear leather. We also provide a free vegan starter kit to help people transition to eating vegan.

Does PETA India support the beef ban?

Yes, and we encourage others to support it, too, but we feel it’s incomplete as it doesn’t include buffaloes, address the source of where slaughterhouses get much of their cattle (the dairy industry) or address the leather industry. In addition, illegal, unlicensed slaughterhouses still exist largely unabated.

Read what PETA India CEO Poorva Joshipura had to say about the beef ban when it came out in Maharashtra.

What about the cruelty of milk production?

PETA India has conducted numerous investigations to highlight the horrors of the dairy industry and encourages the public to try going vegan. Here are some plant-based milks for those who still want the creamy taste.

But India is the world’s top beef exporter. Isn’t this alarming?

Yes. India is the world’s largest producer of milk, which also explains why it’s the world’s largest beef exporter and has a substantial veal industry. If you want no part in supporting the beef industry, go dairy-free. Learn more about this connection here.

Why doesn’t PETA call for a ban on animal sacrifice, such as during Eid?

All religions call for compassion, and no religion requires meat-eating.

The Indian Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Slaughter House) Rules, 2001, already states that “animals [are] not to be slaughtered except in recognised or licensed houses”.

This means that anyone who learns about slaughter that is to take place outside of a licensed slaughterhouse can report it to the police.

In 2010 and 2011, the High Court of Uttarakhand deliberated on a public-interest litigation aimed at banning animal sacrifice. The court concluded that “in view of the law made, despite there being [an] old tradition of sacrificing animals to appease deities, no such sacrifice is permissible outside a slaughterhouse”.

This court made an exception for rural areas, where licensed slaughterhouses may not exist, but clarified that there, “it is obligatory on the part of the State to ensure that such destruction/killing/sacrifice is for the purpose of arranging food for mankind and for no other purpose”. The High Court’s decision paved the way for more legal progress on the subject of animal sacrifice.

In 2014, the High Court of Himachal Pradesh banned animal sacrifice in the state.

In its order, the court observed that “sacrifice causes immense pain and suffering to the innocent animals” and that “compassion is basic tenets in all the religions”. It referred to animal sacrifice as “a social evil” that’s “required to be curbed”.

Here, you can read a letter that the AWBI sent to all states in advance of Eid notifying them of the relevant laws.

Does PETA India do any work to address cruelty to elephants in temples and for Thrissur Pooram?

 Yes. Following an inspection by the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) with veterinarians and other inspectors from PETA India, Animal Rahat and Heritage Animal Task Force that revealed apparently illegal conduct and abuse of elephants at the Thrissur Pooram event held in Kerala on 29 and 30 April 2015, the Supreme Court of India directed that no elephants used during poorams (festivals) should be treated with cruelty. If any owner, organiser, festival or temple coordination committee treats elephants cruelly, they will be held liable for contempt of the Supreme Court order. The matter was brought before the Court in an intervention application filed by co-opted member of the AWBI Gauri Maulekhi.

Here’s the heartwarming story of an elephant we rescued from living a life in chains in a temple.

What about horse racing? Isn’t that wrong, too?

Yes, it absolutely is. See why here.

What about animals killed for KFC and other multinational companies?

Please visit the links below:

http://www.kentuckyfriedcruelty.com/

http://www.mccruelty.com/

What about camel slaughter?

The Food Safety and Standards Act prohibits the slaughter of camels in India. If anyone hears about instances of camel slaughter, they can report it to the police. You can read the letter from the AWBI regarding this matter here.

Why doesn’t PETA India do anything about bullfighting in Spain?

In India, bullfighting is banned under the same laws and Supreme Court judgement as jallikattu.

PETA India’s main regional focus is South Asia, but there are many groups, including our UK and US affiliates, which are working on bullfighting issues, and we support their efforts.

Towns in Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela, France and Portugal have declared themselves to be against bullfighting, and Catalonia, a region in Spain, has banned it.

How is PETA India funded?

Our supporters are individuals who want to make this world a kinder place for animals. Learn how you too can become a member.

What do you have to say about PETA US?

PETA India and PETA US are separate entities. PETA India is an Indian group.

We encourage you to learn about PETA US’ work through this website. To learn more about its hands-on work with animals, please watch this video.

Should you have any questions about PETA US, we urge you to write to Info@peta.org.

 

For more information on PETA India, please visit PETAIndia.com.

Martin Luther King Jr. and Animal Rights

Written by PETA

Posted 01-15-2016, 11:34 AM

The fate of animals today is similar to that of humans who were subjected to slavery and other civil rights injustices—they, too, are tortured, abused, and neglected as humans once were and sometimes still are. Animals are slaughtered  by the billions every year in the food industry, without even a thought to their feelings or needs. They languish in small stalls and cages or are otherwise deprived of everything that is natural and important to them, until the day that they are sent to slaughter. Animals suffer similarly for the sake of entertainment, fashion, and experimentation.

Never be silent.  Share some of these quotes from Martin Luther King Jr. with your friends and family in order to lend your voice to suffering animals today:

On Silence

Martin Luther Quote 1 FINAL2orca_2D00_silence_2D00_friends1

 On Equality

Martin Luther Quote 2 FINALtiedelephant1

On Morals

Martin Luther Quote 3 FINALaffectsoneaffectsall1

Martin Luther Quote 4 FINAL2cowtimeisalwaysright1

Martin Luther Quote 5 FINAL2hitlerpig1

Martin Luther Quote 6 FINAL2thatitisright1

On Action for Animals

Martin Luther Quote 7 FINAL2pigcompanion1

Martin Luther King Jr. took a stand against inequality and rallied for civil liberties. Rise up against the injustices that are happening behind closed doors right now and make a change for the world and its inhabitants.

Let freedom ring for everyone—human and otherwise.

 

SC Refuses To Vacate Stay On Jallikattu Notification

Written by PETA

Posted 01-13-2016, 05:19 PM

The Honourable Supreme Court of India today refused to vacate the stay on the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) 7th January 2016 Gazette of India notification permitting events such as jallikattu and bull races. The Court was hearing an intervention application filed by four persons who were arguing that Jallikattu should be allowed. The Court had yesterday stayed the 7th January 2016 notification which was issued despite a Supreme Court judgement that categorically held that such events cannot be allowed. This means events such as jallikattu and bull races still cannot currently be held.

Yesterday’s stay was issued in response to a battery of urgent petitions filed with the court led by the government advisory body the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) and supported by PETA India, the Federation of Indian Animal Protection Organisations (FIAPO) and Compassion Unlimited Plus Action (CUPA) against the 7 January 2016 notification. Further, individuals Sowmya Reddy, Radha Rajan and Gauri Maulekhi filed petitions against this notification, with two of them being contempt petitions. All of these petitions call for the court to strike down the 7 January 2016 notification permitting the use of bulls in events such as jallikattu in Tamil Nadu and bullock cart races elsewhere in the country.

PETA India has documented in AWBI-authorised inspections that during jallikattu events, terrified bulls are often deliberately disoriented by being given substances like alcohol; have their tails twisted and bitten; are stabbed and jabbed by sickles, spears, knives or sticks; and are punched, jumped on and dragged to the ground. Three bulls even died during jallikattu events in 2014. During races, bulls are often hit with nail-studded sticks and pushed beyond the point of exhaustion. In bullfights, which often occur in Goa, a round ends when one of the bulls manages to flee – or is killed.

Also, hundreds of human participants were injured each year when jallikattu was permitted, and many were killed. Between just 2010 and 2014, approximately 1,100 injuries to humans were reported by the media as a result of cruel and dangerous jallikattu-type events, and 17 people died – including a child. Since these figures were taken only from media reports currently available online, the actual figure is likely higher. Many human injuries also go unreported.

The petitioners are represented by senior advocates Aryama Sundaram (AWBI), Anand Grover (PETA), KK Venugopal (FIAPO), Siddharth Luthra (CUPA), Mr Venkatramani (Sowmya Reddy and Radha Rajan) and Dushyant Dave (Gauri Maulekhi, trustee, People for Animals).

You Can Help Bulls

Urge the Centre to withdraw the notification allowing events such as jallikattu and bull races.

jallikattu festival for action alert - 280 by 280

 

 

 

PETA Youth Looks Back at 2015

Written by PETA

Posted 01-13-2016, 12:27 PM

It’s been a spectacular year for PETA Youth and helping animals. Check out our top memories from 2015:

    1. PETA Youth launched our cutting-edge “I, Chicken” virtual reality experience, which lets participants discover in three short minutes that chickens have interests and needs, feel pain and fear, and don’t want to die to fill our plates.

Even the hit contemporary folk group and animal advocates The Raghu Dixit Project braved the experience and found out what it’s like to be a chicken who is raised for food.

Raghu Dixit trying i chicken

And since “the Force” is strong in vegans, we went all Star Wars–themed to give participants a far-out empathy experience.

Star Wars theme at Stall

2. In Pune, PETA Youth members took part in a motorcycle rally organised by Moto Day and Blitzkrieg Riding Club to promote two simple things everyone can do to help homeless Indian cats and dogs and curb overpopulation: adoption and sterilisation.

via GIPHY

3. For Friendship Day, Street Teamers from Indira College of Commerce & Science in PuneRA Podar College of Commerce & Economics in Mumbai and Rotary Club of Mumbai Versova in Andheri West set up a table to screen “Glass Walls”, a must-see video about the meat, egg and dairy industries. They also distributed DVD copies of the video and wristbands that read, “Friends Don’t Eat Friends”.

via GIPHY

4. At college festivals around the country, Street Teamers set up vegan-themed stalls to get the word out about choosing healthy Earth– and animal-friendly foods.

mascots promoting veganism at festival

Our adorable animal mascots joined the fun by carrying a banner that asked festivalgoers to “take the first step and go vegan”.

5. We also took our “WTF” Challenge to college festivals and dared attendees to watch a 60-second exposé of how animals are abused and killed for food without screaming … well, you know what.

glasswalls theme stall

6. In Pune, Delhi and Mumbai, our Street Team got in on the “Happy Streets” events that were held in cities across India by giving out positive and helpful information on how to live a healthy and cruelty-free life – for instance, by purchasing only products that haven’t been tested on animals and choosing vegan food, cruelty-free clothing and animal-free entertainment.

via GIPHY

7. Here at PETA, we encourage creativity, so we took face-painting and T-shirt design contests to college festivals. Art for animals’ sake!

via GIPHY

8. At prestigious learning institutions, including the Indian Institute of Management Indore, the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati and the College of Engineering Roorkee, we screened the groundbreaking documentaries Cowspiracy and The Ghosts in Our Machine.

via GIPHY

9. We spoke to large audiences of college students about why there is no such thing as a meat-eating environmentalist. Raising animals for food is responsible for a shocking 51 per cent or more of global greenhouse-gas emissions. According to the United Nations, a global shift toward a vegan diet is one of the steps necessary to combat the worst effects of climate change.

talks

10. To spread awareness that leather is someone’s skin, our mission asked PETA Youth members to make a Dubsmash video response to the question “What would a cow say to someone wearing a leather shoe?”

dubsmash

11. You know how they say there’s strength in numbers? Our Street Teamers put this concept into practice in Mumbai by holding a bicycle rally about animal rights and distributing leaflets.

Cycle rally

12. Animal rights took centre stage when college band M-Sonic wore PETA Youth T-shirts during their rocking performance at RG Kar Medical College’s annual Lobelia fest.

msonic3

With your help, we’re looking forward to many more moments like these in 2016. Happy New Year!

Supreme Court Stays Government Notification: Jallikattu, Bull Races Cannot Be Conducted

Written by PETA

Posted 01-12-2016, 02:51 PM

jallikattu victory 2016 image for thumbnail

Today, the Honourable Supreme Court of India stayed the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) 7th January 2016 Gazette of India notification permitting events such as jallikattu and bull races despite a Supreme Court judgement that categorically held that such events cannot be allowed. This means events such as jallikattu and bull races cannot currently be held.

The progress comes in response to a battery of urgent petitions filed with the court led by the government advisory body the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) and supported by PETA India, the Federation of Indian Animal Protection Organisations (FIAPO) and Compassion Unlimited Plus Action (CUPA) against the 7 January 2016 notification. Further, individuals Sowmya Reddy, Radha Rajan and Gauri Maulekhi filed petitions against this notification, with two of them being contempt petitions. All of these petitions call for the court to strike down the 7 January 2016 notification permitting the use of bulls in events such as jallikattu in Tamil Nadu and bullock cart races elsewhere in the country.

In 2014, the Supreme Court had ruled that cruelty is inherent in these events, as bulls are not anatomically suited for such activities. Making them participate subjects them to unnecessary pain and suffering, so such events were outlawed. The court also stated that when culture and tradition are at variance with the law enacted by Parliament, the law would take precedence.

PETA India has documented in AWBI-authorised inspections that during jallikattu events, terrified bulls are often deliberately disoriented by being given substances like alcohol; have their tails twisted and bitten; are stabbed and jabbed by sickles, spears, knives or sticks; and are punched, jumped on and dragged to the ground. Three bulls even died during jallikattu events in 2014. During races, bulls are often hit with nail-studded sticks and pushed beyond the point of exhaustion. In bullfights, which often occur in Goa, a round ends when one of the bulls manages to flee – or is killed.

Also, hundreds of human participants were injured each year when jallikattu was permitted, and many were killed. Between just 2010 and 2014, approximately 1,100 injuries to humans were reported by the media as a result of cruel and dangerous jallikattu-type events, and 17 people died – including a child. Since these figures were taken only from media reports currently available online, the actual figure is likely higher. Many human injuries also go unreported.

 

The petitioners are represented by senior advocates Aryama Sundaram (AWBI), Anand Grover (PETA), KK Venugopal (FIAPO), Siddharth Luthra (CUPA), Mr Venkatramani (Sowmya Reddy and Radha Rajan) and Dushyant Dave (Gauri Maulekhi, trustee, People for Animals).

You Can Help Bulls

Urge the Centre to withdraw the notification allowing events such as jallikattu and bull races.

jallikattu festival for action alert - 280 by 280

Animal Welfare Board, PETA, Others Petition Supreme Court on Jallikattu, Bull Races

Written by PETA

Posted 01-11-2016, 03:29 PM

Today, the government advisory body the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) – supported by PETA India, the Federation of Indian Animal Protection Organisations (FIAPO) and Compassion Unlimited Plus Action (CUPA) – brought a battery of urgent petitions before the Chief Justice’s bench of the Honourable Supreme Court of India.

In addition, individuals (including Sowmya Reddy, Radha Rajan and Gauri Maulekhi) also filed petitions. All petitions call for the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) notification of 7 January 2016 via The Gazette of India permitting the use of bulls in events such as jallikattu in Tamil Nadu and bullock cart races elsewhere in the country to be struck down. Urgent listing of these petitions was sought and has been allowed for tomorrow.

The MoEFCC’s 7 January 2016 notification permitting events such as jallikattu and bull races came despite a Supreme Court judgement that categorically held that the Ministry cannot allow jallikattu, bull races or bullfights and cannot modify the notification dated 11 July 2011 (which banned forcing bulls to perform) without consulting with the AWBI. In December 2015, the AWBI advised the Ministry not to go against the Supreme Court judgement. The court also ruled that cruelty is inherent in these events, as bulls are not anatomically suited for such activities. Making them participate subjects them to unnecessary pain and suffering, so such events were outlawed. The court also stated that when culture and tradition are at variance with the law enacted by Parliament, the law would take precedence. The 7 January 2016 notification flies in the face of this ruling.

SN Variava, a former judge of the Supreme Court, opined regarding the 7 January 2016 notification that “the Supreme Court has held that bulls are not performing animals. Nevertheless, the 2016 Notification incorrectly proceeds on the basis that bulls are performing animals”. He further adds, “MoEF is not authorized by the provisions of Section 22 of the Act to impose any conditions as has been done under the 2016 Notification. Once it is held/notified under Section 22 of the Act that an animal cannot be exhibited or trained as a performing animal, there is no question of permitting such an exhibition or training subject to any conditions”.

 When jallikattu was permitted in the past under regulations, PETA India documented in AWBI-authorised inspections that during events, terrified bulls were often deliberately disoriented by being given substances such as alcohol; having their tails twisted and bitten; being stabbed and jabbed by sickles, spears, knives or sticks; and being punched, jumped on and dragged to the ground. Three bulls even died during jallikattu events in 2014. During races, bulls are often hit with nail-studded sticks and pushed beyond the point of exhaustion. In bullfights, which often occur in Goa, a round ends when one of the bulls manages to flee (or is killed).

Between 2010 and 2014, approximately 1,100 injuries to humans were reported by the media as a result of cruel and dangerous jallikattu-type events, and 17 people died, including a child. Since these figures were taken from media reports currently available online, the actual figure is likely higher, as many human injuries go unreported.

The petitioners were represented by Senior Advocates Aryama Sundaram (AWBI), Anand Grover (PETA), Siddharth Luthra (CUPA), KK Venugopal (FIAPO), Mr Venkatramani (Sowmya Reddy and Radha Rajan) and Dushyant Dave (Gauri Maulekhi, Trustee, People for Animals).

You Can Help Bulls

Urge the Centre to withdraw the notification allowing events such as jallikattu and bull races.

jallikattu festival for action alert - 280 by 280

Government Allows Jallikattu and Bull Races; PETA Vows to Go to Supreme Court

Written by PETA

Posted 01-08-2016, 02:11 PM

Via a 7 January 2016 notification in the Gazette of India, the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEF&CC) is again permitting events like jallikattu and bull races.

PETA India has documented that during jallikattu, terrified bulls are often deliberately disoriented by being given substances like alcohol; having their tails twisted and bitten; being stabbed and jabbed by sickles, spears, knives or sticks; and being punched, jumped on and dragged to the ground.

And as calculated from various media reports, there were approximately 1,100 human injuries and 17 deaths, including that of a child, from 2010 to 2014 as a result of jallikattu-type events.

During races, bulls are often hit with nail-studded sticks. In bullfights, a round ends when one of the bulls manages to flee or is killed.

The MoEF&CC’s decision comes despite a Supreme Court judgement that categorically held that the Ministry cannot allow jallikattu, bull races or bullfights and cannot modify the notification dated 11 July 2011 (which banned forcing bulls to perform) without approval from the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI). Just last week, the AWBI advised the Ministry not to go against the Supreme Court judgement. The court had also ruled that cruelty is inherent in these events, as bulls are not anatomically suited for such activities. Making them participate is subjecting them to unnecessary pain and suffering, so such events were outlawed. The court also stated that when culture and tradition are at variance with the law enacted by Parliament, the law would take precedence.

You can help bulls. Urge the government to withdraw the Gazette notification.

Jallikattu_Cruelty

Most Popular PETA India Facebook Posts of 2015

Written by PETA

Posted 01-06-2016, 03:26 PM

People may have different ideas about what will make for a viral Facebook post, but for us, it’s one that really grabs people’s attention and starts countless conversations about animal rights issues – and probably saves some lives, too.

Check out the most popular PETA India Facebook posts of 2015:

    1. This video exposed the horrifically cruel treatment of alligators who are KICKED and KILLED for Hermès products.

BREAKING INVESTIGATION:This is where Birkin bags, belts and watchbands for luxury French retailer Hermès come from:…

Posted by PETA India on Thursday, June 25, 2015

 

Number of people reached by this Facebook post: 12,800,846

After watching this video, people remarked that fashion is not worth this.

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2. This video exposed people to the heartbreaking PETA Asia investigation of the dog leather industry in China.

What if this happened to your dog? #BeLeatherFree

Posted by PETA India on Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Despite (or maybe because of) its graphic content, this post reached more than 10 million people. Many people could not finish the video.

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Some people also expressed their shock and urged others not to buy leather.

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3. This video reminded everyone that all animals matter.

This video will make you want a #meatban every day. http://bit.ly/YGWU3p

Posted by PETA India on Thursday, September 10, 2015

After watching it, many people said that they will adopt a plant-based diet.

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Many people also expressed that they are already proud vegetarians.

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4. This post, in response to the public outcry over China’s dog meat Yulin festival, reminded people that chickens do not want to be eaten, either.

Dogs and cats KILLED in China for meat: http://bit.ly/1J7eQ0i.Chickens and pigs KILLED in India for meat: http://bit.ly/1yZUYC2.What’s the difference?#NotOursToEat #StopYulin2015 #TryVegan

Posted by PETA India on Thursday, June 18, 2015

This post reached over 4 million people, and many of them remarked that it is wrong to eat any animals.

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5. This post featured gruesome footage of Indian dairy farms on #InternationalMeatlessDay.

Milk is non-veg. Don’t believe us? Watch this. #InternationalMeatlessDay

Posted by PETA India on Wednesday, November 25, 2015

People wanted to know how they could help end such cruelty.

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6. This video of a woman who was “experimented on” in Delhi aimed to help people try to relate to the fate of animals in laboratories. The post reached 2,719,744 people and 535,739 views.

Woman ‘experimented on’ in Delhi.WARNING: This could be the most disturbing VIDEO you have EVER seen. #StopAnimalTests

Posted by PETA India on Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Many important conversations were started because of it.

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Some also expressed their desire to help bring about change.

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7. This post urged people not to throw colours on animals during Holi.

KIND REQUEST FOR HOLI!Please urge your friends to play Holi without disturbing animals. Toxic irritating colour gets into their eyes, on their skin and in their mouths. #SafeHoli #Holi

Posted by PETA India on Monday, March 2, 2015

Many agreed, and more than 17,000 people shared the post on their Facebook pages.

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Some also went a step further and shared photos with a similar message.

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8. This video, which was shown to JD Institute of Fashion Technology India students, concerns what happens to animals used for fashion.

Students at JD Institute of Fashion Technology India were recently shown this video about animals used for fashion. Can you get through it? Details: http://bit.ly/1S5WVYW

Posted by PETA India on Monday, November 2, 2015

Many were thankful to be informed of the truth.

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9. During World Vegan Month, we showed why people are going vegan.

THIS is why people are going #vegan #Reasons2GoVegan

Posted by PETA India on Thursday, November 5, 2015

This post definitely encouraged many people to go vegan, too.

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10. We posted a heartbreaking 60-second video showing how animals are treated in Indian circuses.

This video will make you want all animals out of circuses.

Posted by PETA India on Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Many joined the call to ban all animals from circuses.

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11. We took the opportunity to tell people that if they do not eat beef, they stop should stop wearing leather, too.

Love cows but wear leather? This 60 seconds will make you think twice. #BeLeatherFree

Posted by PETA India on Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Many people encouraged others to ditch leather.

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12. We posted a collage showing how cows are turned into leather.

HEARTBREAKING!Workers in Indian slaughterhouses typically slash the throats of cows – in full view of others – with a…

Posted by PETA India on Wednesday, March 18, 2015

In response, people said that they will stop buying leather.

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13. We posted a thought-provoking video about leather, made by FAD International students for PETA.

Check out this thought-provoking video about leather made by FAD International students for PETA! http://bit.ly/1FhbKCp

Posted by PETA India on Sunday, May 17, 2015

People really loved the video and agreed that wearing animal skins is ugly.

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In the age of social media, the power to effect change is at our fingertips. Every PETA post that you share educates others, inspires them, raises awareness of important issues, changes minds and helps animals more than you ever imagined.

10 Terrific Recipe Videos

Written by PETA

Posted 01-05-2016, 11:46 AM

Pledge to go vegan by trying out these amazing vegan recipes to protect animalstheir own health and the planet, with the aim of going vegan for life.

1. Chef Suresh Waghmare shows you how to make Tortellini del Casale from Little Italy‘s delicious vegan menu.

2. Chef Waghmare from Little Italy is at it again, this time with a delicious pomodoro minestrone soup recipe.

3. And this Contadina salad recipe from Little Italy’s chef Waghmare is also utterly delish.

4. Chef Suraj Garg from Trikaya shares his signature Kung Pao Potato Okra recipe, which is perfect for any occasion.

5. Try this lip-smacking vegan buffalo cauliflower wings recipe, demonstrated by PETA’s own Ashley Palmer, and wow your family and friends at parties.

6. Here’s a simple yet wonderful take on a vegan watermelon and arugula salad. Inspired by Le Pain Quotidien‘s founder, Alain Coumont, this salad is part of the restaurant’s delicious vegan menu.

7. Chef Amit from Le Pain Quotidien shares the recipe for the restaurant’s vegan Red Bean Hummus Tartine, again inspired by founder Alain Coumont.

8. The White Owl Brewery & Bistro‘s Chef Shama shares her delicious House Yellow Curry recipe.

9. The sisters behind Spork Foods show you how to make the tastiest vegan spinach dip ever. It is perfect for parties!

10. Use Ashley’s recipe to wow friends with this yummy vegan pesto pasta.

For more help in making the switch to healthy vegan eating, order our FREE vegan starter kit.

Order your free vegan starter kit

 

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