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  • 5 Ways PETA Affiliates Are Advancing Science

    Written by PETA

    In honour of National Science Day (28 February), we've compiled the following list of the top five ways that PETA affiliates are modernising science in India and around the world:

    1. Ending product tests on animals: Blinding bunnies for mascara or detergent? Not on our watch! Following intense campaigns by PETA India and work by MP Maneka Gandhi, the relevant Bureau of Indian Standards committees decided to remove animal tests from the standards that determine the requirements for cosmetics and household products! Cosmetics and household products tested on animals are still sold in India, though, so check out our list of cruelty-free companies here.
    2. Cutting out dissection: Animals deserve to be left in peace – not pieces. Thanks to PETA India, MP Maneka Gandhi and others, the Ministry of Environment and Forests has issued guidelines to stop dissection completely and experimentation on animals for training both undergraduate and post-graduate students. Despite this measure, dissections have not completely come to an end. Lend a hand here.
    3. Trauma-free trauma and medical training: PETA US has helped medical training programs in nine countries stop cutting apart and killing animals in surgery courses and instead start using life-like human-patient simulators. What's more, PETA India sponsored a series of free continuing medical-education workshops on alternatives to the use of animals in the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery programmes at numerous Indian medical colleges.
    4. Funding non-animal tests and shareholder resolutions: To date, PETA US has provided more than $1 million in funding for promising non-animal test methods and other alternatives to replace animal testing! And in case there is any question that we seriously mean business, check out the consortium that PETA affiliates created to implement non-animal testing. Another way that PETA US helps animals in laboratories is through its innovative shareholder campaign. PETA US has filed shareholder resolutions covering many animal testing issues with dozens of chemical and pharmaceutical companies.
    5. Rescues: Thanks to PETA India and others, 70 beagles who had been imported from China by Advinus Therapeutics, a pharmaceutical laboratory in Bangalore, were rescued and released to animal-protection groups for adoption!

    Show your support for animals who are suffering in laboratories by letting the world know that testing on animals is dead wrong and that you won't be part of it!

  • PETA Calls On UGC to End Animal Dissection Completely

    Written by PETA

    More than two years after the University Grants Commission (UGC) – the apex regulatory body for higher education in India – published official recommendations calling for an end to animal dissection and animal experimentation in university and college zoology and life-sciences courses in a phased manner, it has finally taken some action to ensure compliance by sending a letter to universities.

    The step was taken after numerous appeals from PETA India and MP Maneka Gandhi to the UGC to stop animal dissections and ensure compliance with guidelines issued by the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) in January 2012, which call for the UGC to direct learning institutions registered under it to use alternatives to animals in anatomy and other courses and to ban dissection in pharmacy and life-sciences courses at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

    Instead, the UGC has written to universities seeking compliance with the guidelines it issued in 2011, which state that although undergraduate students should no longer be required to dissect animals, professors may dissect one animal for demonstration purposes and dissection is optional for postgraduate students. Although these changes represent progress, PETA India has pointed out that the UGC's recommendations fall short of those made by the MoEF in 2012, which aim to eliminate animal dissection entirely.

    Every year, frogs, mice, rats, guinea pigs and rabbits suffer and die in university laboratories. The findings of nearly every published comparative study in science-education literature show that non-animal methods – including computer simulations, interactive CD-ROMs, films, charts and lifelike models – teach anatomy and complex biological processes as well as or better than inhumane and archaic animal laboratories.

    Because of the cruelty to animals inherent in dissection, it can deter students from continuing with their studies in the sciences. Research has shown that a significant number of students at every educational level are uncomfortable with the use of animals in dissection and experimentation, and some even turn away from scientific careers rather than violating their principles.

    While PETA is pleased about the UGC's step towards cracking down on animal dissection, until the commission ends animal dissection in every classroom, it is doing students a huge disservice.

    Urge the UGC to end the use of animals for dissection in the country's university classrooms completely by writing to Prof. Ved Prakash at cm@ugc.ac.in.

  • Have a ♥ for Animals This Valentine's Day

    Written by PETA

    Attention, Street Teamers! Show your ♥ for animals by getting "liked" on Facebook. Simply cut out a paper heart and write an animal-friendly message on it. Get creative!

    Are you proud to be vegan? Have you given leather the boot? Let everybody know how you show love for animals. Post a pic of yourself holding your sign on Facebook and see how many "likes" you get for your super-duper, totally inspiring piece of animal-friendly, heart-shaped awesomeness. Take a screenshot of the masterpiece, along with how many "likes" you've received, and send it to us at Youth@petaindia.org by 12 February along with your name, postal address and phone number to receive fun PETA stickers. How sweet is that?!

    Need some inspiration? Click here, and check out this fab pic:

    Questions? E-mail Youth@petaindia.org.

     

  • More Animal Tests to be Removed by BIS

    Written by PETA

    Yesterday, following input from PETA India and support from MP Maneka Gandhi and other Members of Parliament, the Soaps and Other Surface Active Agents (CHD 25) Committee of the Bureau of Indian Standards, which determines which tests are required under Indian Standards 11601 (Methods of Safety Evaluation of Synthetic Detergents Tests for Skin Irritation and Sensitization Potential of Synthetic Detergents) and 13424 (Safety Evaluation of Bathing Bars and Toilet Soaps Methods of Test), decided to remove animal tests from the requirements, thereby ending the testing of household products, such as cleaners and detergents, and their ingredients on animals to meet standard requirements in India. The official meeting minutes are expected to be released soon.

    PETA India's science policy adviser, Dr Chaitanya Koduri, is the only representative from an animal-protection group to have an official seat on the committee that decided to remove the final remaining animal test – in which harsh chemicals were rubbed onto guinea pigs' abraded skin – from the standards, replacing it with non-animal testing methods and followed by a test called the Human Repeated Insult Patch Test.

    This action comes after Bureau of Indian Standards committee PCD 19, which is responsible for determining which tests are required for testing cosmetics and their ingredients, removed all animal tests after hearing from Koduri and Gandhi.

    PETA India's campaign to end household-product tests on animals has been endorsed by the Animal Welfare Board of India and the Mahatma Gandhi-Doerenkamp Center for Alternatives to Use of Animals in Life Science Education. In addition to Gandhi, a wide variety of politicians have also supported an end to animal tests for household products. Congress President Smt Sonia Gandhi, Bharatiya Janata Party leader Lal Krishna Advani and MP Abhijit Mukherjee as well as the ministers of state for Health and Family Welfare, Labour and Employment and Agriculture and Food Processing Industries, among others, had sent appeals to the Ministries of Health and Family Welfare and Consumer Affairs to consider PETA India's request. Caring citizens from all over India also took part in PETA India’s action alert to send appeals to the Ministries.

    Now India can be considered just behind Israel, which has not only enacted a ban on animal testing for cosmetics and household products, but has also banned the sale of cosmetics and household products tested on animals anywhere in the world. PETA is now working with the support of celebrities to urge the Indian government to ban the sale of all animal-tested cosmetics and household products.

  • Stars Want End to Product Tests on Animals

    Written by PETA

    PETA India's petition to ban the testing of household products on animals – as well as the sale of cosmetics and household products tested on animals outside India – is starting to read like a who's who of Bollywood and the fashion world. That's because Raveena Tandon-Thadani, Jacqueline Fernandez, Dia Mirza, R Madhavan, Rahul Khanna, Sunny Leone, Pooja Bhatt, Lara Dutta, Trisha Krishnan, Dino Morea, Esha Deol-Takhtani, Sarah-Jane Dias, Shweta Salve, Soniya Mehra, Suchitra Pillai, squash player Ritwik Bhattacharya and top models Acquin Pais, Alesia Raut, Anushka Manchanda, Binal Trivedi, Candice Pinto, Carol Gracias, Diandra Soares, Juhi Pande, Nethra Raghuraman, Pia Trivedi and Shonali Nagrani have signed the petition, which has been sent to the Ministries of Health & Family Welfare and Consumer Affairs, and are determined to make cruel and unreliable tests on animals a thing of the past.


    The deadline for comments on draft standards IS 11601 and IS 13424 to the Soaps and Other Surface Active Agents Committee of the Chemical Department of the Bureau of Indian Standards, on which PETA India Science Policy Adviser Dr Chaitanya Koduri has an official seat, was 8 January. The committee has proposed to amend the test requirements for household products (such as cleaners and detergents) by replacing the last animal test remaining, a test on guinea pigs for determining skin-sensitisation potential of chemicals, with a non-animal test method called "the human repeated insult patch test". It was also proposed that the manufacturers of novel ingredients should submit safety data using non-animal methods of testing. A decision is expected on the matter after 8th January.

    Following an extensive PETA campaign and efforts by MP Maneka Gandhi, India recently removed tests on animals from the Bureau of Indian Standard for cosmetics and the Drugs Technical Advisory Board in its 65th meeting held on 25 November 2013, recommended the addition of a suitable provision under The Drugs and Cosmetics Rules, 1945, to prohibit the import of cosmetics that have been tested on animals abroad. However, currently cosmetics and household products tested on animals are still allowed to be sold in India.

    You can help by buying only cruelty-free cosmetics and household products.

  • PETA, OUAT Hold Compassionate Science Workshop

    Written by PETA

    Orissa University of Agriculture & Technology (OUAT) – in association with PETA – organised a national workshop for medical, pharmacy, veterinary, zoology and other life-sciences professors, post-graduate students and researchers from colleges and research laboratories all over India in order to familiarise them with humane methods of educating students, such as by obtaining cadavers ethically and using non-animal models and computer-simulation programmes.

    Dr PC Bisoi, a dean at OUAT; Dr AK Mahapatra, director of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in Bhubaneswar; Dr Manilal Valliyate, PETA's director of veterinary affairs; Dr Umakanth Mishra, Head of Anatomy Department at OUAT and RK Das, OUAT's registrar.

    The keynote speakers at the workshop, which was held on 13 November, included Professor MR Kar, the vice-chancellor of OUAT; RK Das, OUAT's registrar; Dr PC Bisoi, a dean at OUAT; Dr Umakanth Mishra, head of Anatomy Department at OUAT and Dr AK Mahapatra, director of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in Bhubaneswar. The speakers for the technical session included Dr RV Prasad, head of the division of pre- and para-clinical sciences at Karnataka Veterinary, Animal and Fisheries Sciences University in Karnataka; Dr V Ramakrishna, a retired professor of the Department of Anatomy and Histology at Karnataka Veterinary, Animal and Fisheries Sciences University; Dr Mohammad Akbarsha, director of the Mahatma Gandhi-Doerenkamp Center for Alternatives to Use of Animals in Life Science Education in Trichy; Dr Manilal Valliyate, PETA's director of veterinary affairs; and Dr Chaitanya Koduri, PETA's science policy adviser. More than 170 delegates from various colleges and research laboratories attended the workshop.

    Every year, an estimated 1,000 calves are killed in India in order to teach veterinary anatomy and surgery to students, and countless frogs, rats, guinea pigs and rabbits have suffered and died in college laboratories for science training and research. Nearly every published comparative study in science-education literature has concluded that non-animal methods – including computer simulations, interactive CD-ROMs, films, charts and life-like models – teach anatomy and complex biological processes as well as or better than inhumane and archaic animal laboratories.

    Because of the cruelty to animals inherent in dissection, it can deter students from succeeding in the sciences. Research has shown that a significant number of students at every educational level are uncomfortable with the use of animals in dissection and experimentation, and some even turn away from careers in science rather than violating their principles.

    Many students are taking a stand against dissection. To help cut out dissection at your college or university, write to us at Info@petaindia.org.

  • Lend a Hand to Help Cut Out Dissection

    Written by PETA

    Hey, students, can you give abused animals a hand? All you have to do is write "Cut Out Dissection" on your palm(s) using bold, colourful markers and go around high-fiving your friends. How simple is that?!

    When your curious pals ask about the message, explain that animals are killed cruelly for classroom dissections. Although the University Grants Commission  has advised all universities in India to stop using animals, some colleges across the country, including the University of Delhi, have ignored this advice and continue to support the killing of animals such as frogs and rats.

    Such abuse does not belong in the classroom. All animals feel pain and value their lives just as people do. There are kinder, cheaper, more ecological ways to teach anatomy. Progressive schools use computer software, simulators, manikins, and other non-lethal methods to teach students about life. If you give animals a hand and encourage your classmates never to dissect them, more institutions may opt to use these humane and effective methods.

    Be sure to send a photo of your hand with "Cut Out Dissection" on it to Youth@petaindia. Your photo may even be featured on our Facebook or Twitter pages.

    Thanks for lending a hand!

  • 5 Awesome Things to Do This Dussehra

    Written by PETA

    Are you making plans for your best Dussehra yet? Are you ready to burn Ravana and usher in another great year of good triumphing over evil? Then check out PETA's top five tips for making Dussehra the start of an extraordinary year for both you and animals.

    1. Get your foodie on. Browse hundreds of free, mouth-watering vegan recipes that let great flavour triumph over bits of dead animals.
    2. Show off your rockin' style. Sporting faux fur, pleather and mock croc will show that you're comfortable enough in your own skin to let animals keep theirs.
    3. Don't get testy. You can make your pad sparkle without making animals suffer. Just choose household cleaners that weren't tested on animals, such as Astonish.
    4. It's a circus out there. But it doesn't have to be. Patronise human-only forms of entertainment, and leave the ones that abuse animals in the dust.
    5. Have a ball. Play with your companion animals every day, and make them part of the family. And of course, help control animal overpopulation by having your companions sterilised.

    Looking for even more ways to let good win out this Dussehra? Join PETA's Activist Network today.

  • PETA Shortlisted for LUSH Prize 2013

    Written by PETA

    For the second year, international cosmetics company LUSH Cosmetics has announced the finalists for its global LUSH Prize, which recognises outstanding contributions to ending the use of animals in product-safety testing. And for the second year, PETA India is among the finalists, thanks to its successful campaign to end animal tests for cosmetics in India. This year, in addition to being listed as a finalist for the prize for lobbying – which PETA India won as joint runner-up last year – the group has been shortlisted in the public awareness category for its eye-catching, popular campaign that helped bring about an end to the testing of cosmetics and their ingredients on animals in India. The winners will be announced at the LUSH Prize Awards in London on 13 November.

    LUSH operates more than 700 stores in more than 40 countries, with Indian locations including Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Chennai, Delhi, Hyderabad, Kolkata, Mumbai and Pune. In addition never to testing products or ingredients on animals, LUSH marks its vegan items (products that contain no animal-based ingredients whatsoever) with a bright green "V".

    More than 1,300 companies around the world have banned all animal tests, but many still choose to subject animals to painful tests in which substances are smeared onto their skin, sprayed in their faces or forced down their throats. Because of the vast physiological differences between humans and the animals used in these tests, the results are often misleading.

    PETA India celebrated a tremendous victory this year with the end of cosmetics tests on animals in India. At present, PETA India is working to urge the government to replace the testing of household products such as cleaners on animals with modern non-animal methods and to ban the sales and marketing of cosmetics and household products that have been tested on animals in other countries so that consumers can be confident that they are not buying products which have caused animals to suffer.

    Until that happens, you can still shop with a clear conscience by checking out PETA's list of companies that don't test on animals.

  • No Animal Experiments for IRIS Science Fair

    Written by PETA

    Following discussions with PETA India, the Initiative for Research and Innovation in Science (IRIS) and Intel Technology India Pvt Ltd have agreed to amend the rules of the IRIS Science Fair – India's largest student science competition – to ban experiments on animals beginning in 2014. In recognition of their progressive decision to support humane science, Intel and IRIS will each receive PETA's Compassionate Action Award.

    Although IRIS reports that animal use is rare, current rules allow for a variety of painful experiments on animals, and up to 49 per cent of animals in an experiment can be killed. The new IRIS guidelines read, "Projects involving animal subjects or animal data are limited to … [u]se of data from pre-existing, publicly available resources [or] … observational or behavioral projects that involve animals in their natural environment". All the projects should strictly comply with The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960.

    In 2012, following discussions with PETA US, the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair – the world's largest international pre-college science competition, of which IRIS is a precursor – amended its rules to ban deadly experiments on animals and strongly endorse the use of non-animal research methods. The popular Google Science Fair's rules also ban all experiments on animals, stipulating that only data gathered from past experiments or from observations of animals in their natural environment may be used.

    IRIS is a cooperative effort between Intel, the Confederation of Indian Industry and the Indian Department of Science and Technology. Intel and IRIS will each receive a framed certificate.

    This award is part of PETA's work to ensure that students engage in only the best in humane and progressive non-animal research.

  • Bollywood Celebrates Cosmetic Testing Campaign Progress

    Written by PETA

    Bollywood actors Dia Mirza, Neha Dhupia, Sonu Sood, Jacqueline Fernandez, Trisha Krishnan, Madhavan, Priya Anand, Amrita Rao and Ashmit Patel took to Twitter and shared how happy they are about the outcome of an intense campaign by PETA India and work by MP Maneka Gandhi, which resulted in the Drug Controller General of India (DCGI) Dr GN Singh announcing that testing cosmetics and their ingredients on animals will never be permitted in India again. As a result, a decision was made to remove the last remaining animal test from IS 4011:1997 Methods of test for safety evaluation of cosmetics.

    Photo Credits: Amrita Rao - ©Luv Israni
    R. Madhavan - ©Atul Kasbekar

     "I am so thrilled to hear that PETA's efforts to stop cruel animal tests paid off and am immensely grateful to the country's drug controller general for announcing an end to cosmetic testing on animals", says Dia Mirza. "Body Shop is against animal testing and as their ambassador, I was also glad to hear from PETA that they too helped make this happen."

    An excited Neha Dhupia says, "Kudos to DCGI and PETA! Testing cosmetics on animals is cruel and archaic and I am glad India's doing away with it".

    "There is just no need to test lipsticks and shampoos on animals as there are modern, non-animal methods available", says long-time PETA supporter Jacqueline Fernandez. "I am so proud to be a supporter of PETA and thank them and DCGI for making the world a kinder place for animals."

    Trisha Krishnan, who has been part of many campaigns led by PETA, says, "My association with PETA goes a long way and I am happy to be a part of this celebration. I never understood the logic behind testing mascara, soap or shampoo on animals. I'm so happy it has come to an end in India!"

    In 2012, the cast and crew of Farah Khan's Joker, directed by Shirish Kunder and starring Akshay Kumar, Sonakshi Sinha and Chitrangda Singh, joined PETA in urging the government to ban cosmetics testing on animals. Chitrangda posed on behalf of PETA and Joker with the aliens from the film for the campaign. The ad was shot by ace photographer Atul Kasbekar.

    The landmark announcement was made during the meeting of the Bureau of Indian Standards PCD 19 Cosmetics Sectional Committee, on which PETA India's science policy adviser, Dr Chaitanya Koduri, has an official seat. Earlier, Dr Koduri had held a private meeting with Dr Singh to stop the testing of cosmetics on animals.

    Unfortunately, cosmetics which have been tested on animals can still be sold in India. Please always consult our guide of companies that do and do not test on animals before shopping.

  • Ban on Household-Product Tests Closer

    Written by PETA

    The Soaps and Other Surface Active Agents Committee (CHD 25) of the Chemical Division of the Bureau of Indian Standards, on which PETA India Science Policy Adviser Dr Chaitanya Koduri has an official seat, has proposed to amend the test requirements for household products (such as cleaners and detergents) by replacing the last animal test remaining, a test on guinea pigs for determining skin-sensitisation potential of chemicals, with a non-animal test method called "the human repeated insult patch test". It was also proposed that the manufacturers of novel ingredients should submit safety data using non-animal methods of testing. Members of the committee have now been asked to submit their comments. The move follows the recent announcement by the Drugs Controller General of India, Dr GN Singh, that testing cosmetics and their ingredients on animals will not be permitted in India, following an intense PETA campaign and efforts by MP Maneka Gandhi.

    PETA India's campaign to ban household product tests on animals has received support from high places. Gandhi has been working closely with Dr Koduri to push for the ban. The offices of Congress President Smt Sonia Gandhi and the senior leader of the Bharatiya Janata Party, Lal Krishna Advani, have urged the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and the Ministry of Consumers Affairs to look into PETA's request. Santosh Chaudhary, the newly appointed Minister of State for Health and Family Welfare; Kodikunnil Suresh, Minister of State for Labour and Employment; Tariq Anwar, Minister of State for Agriculture and Food Processing Industries and Abhijit Mukherjee, Member of Parliament from Jangipur constituency and son of President Pranab Mukherjee, all sent appeals to the ministries as well. Dr Mirza Mehboob, former Cabinet Minister of Health, Medical Education and Family Welfare for the government of Jammu and Kashmir; Yashodhara Raje Scindia, former Minister for Tourism, Sports and Youth Welfare for the government of Madhya Pradesh and Gandhi have all sent strong appeals to these ministries in favour of a ban on household product tests on animals.

    Officials from the Mahatma Gandhi–Doerenkamp Center for Alternatives to Use of Animals in Life Science Education and the Animal Welfare Board of India have also expressed support for a ban on household product tests on animals.

    The Bureau of Indian Standard's proposal comes in the wake of Israel's recent ban on the testing of cosmetics and household products and their ingredients on animals, which includes a ban on sales of animal-tested products, regardless of where those tests were conducted. In addition, the Home Secretary of the UK government proposed a ban on household-product testing in 2011, and the UK has announced that it is consulting with companies, trade bodies and other interested parties to confirm a working proposal.

    More than 1,300 companies around the world have banned all animal tests in favour of effective, modern non-animal tests, but many still choose to subject animals to painful tests in which substances are dripped into their eyes, smeared onto their abraded skin, sprayed in their faces or forced down their throats. Because of the vast physiological differences between humans and the animals used in these tests, the results are often misleading.

    Urge the government to ban household products tests on animals today.

  • Cosmetic Tests on Animals Removed by BIS

    Written by Erika-G

    Following an intense campaign by PETA India and work by MP Maneka Gandhi, Drug Controller General of India (DCGI) Dr GN Singh announced that testing cosmetics and their ingredients on animals will not be permitted in India. The landmark announcement was made during the Bureau of Indian Standards PCD 19 Cosmetics Sectional Committee meeting, on which PETA India's science policy advisor, Dr Chaitanya Koduri, has an official seat. Earlier this week, Dr Koduri had held a private meeting with Dr Singh urging him to stop animal tests for cosmetics. As a result, a decision was made to remove the last remaining animal test from IS 4011:1997 Methods of test for safety evaluation of cosmetics.

    PETA India's campaign has received support from high places. Congress President Smt Sonia Gandhi recently urged the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare to consider PETA India's request for a ban on the testing of cosmetics and their ingredients through the National Advisory Council Office, while senior leader of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) Lal Krishna Advani had sought the same through his office. Santosh Chowdhury, the newly appointed Minister of State for Health & Family Welfare; Dr Mirza Mehboob, former Cabinet Minister of Health, Medical Education and Family Welfare for the government of Jammu and Kashmir; and Yashodhara Raje Scindia, former Minister for Tourism, Sports and Youth Welfare for the government of Madhya Pradesh had all sent strong appeals to the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare in favour of a total ban on the testing of cosmetics and their ingredients on animals. Mehboob is also a medical practitioner who did his MBBS at Srinagar Medical College in Jammu and Kashmir. MP Maneka Gandhi has been working closely with PETA India's science policy advisor, Dr Chaitanya Koduri, to push for a ban.

    Multinational companies The Body Shop and LUSH as well as Indian companies Trumount Cosmoceuticals, Future Skin, Omved Lifestyle and Shahnaz Husain and others had also written to the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare in full support of a ban after hearing from PETA. The Washington DC-based Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, and officials from the Indian Council of Medical Research, the Mahatma Gandhi–Doerenkamp Center for Alternatives to Use of Animals in Life Science Education and the Animal Welfare Board of India, a statutory advisory body, had also all expressed support for the ban.

    In 2012, the cast and crew of Farah Khan's Joker, directed by Shirish Kunder and starring Akshay Kumar, Sonakshi Sinha and Chitrangda Singh, had joined PETA in urging the government to ban cosmetic testing on animals. Chitrangda posed on behalf of PETA and Joker with the aliens from the film for the campaign. The ad was shot by ace photographer Atul Kasbekar.

    DCGI's announcement comes in the wake of the European Union's and Israel's bans on the testing of cosmetics products and their ingredients on animals, which includes a ban on sales of animal-tested cosmetics, regardless of where those tests were conducted. Israel has also banned the testing of household products and their ingredients on animals as well as the sale of such products if they have been tested on animals. Household products include cleaners and detergents. PETA India is also campaigning for an end to the testing of household products and their ingredients on animals in India.

    Please note, however, that at present, cosmetics and personal-care products tested on animals can still be sold in India. Please do check PETA's list of companies that do not test on animals before you go shopping.

    PETA is now working to urge the Indian government to implement a legislative ban and to ban the sale of all animal-tested cosmetics and household products.

  • PETA, MAFSU Hold National Veterinary Workshop

    Written by Erika-G

    After hearing from PETA calling for an end to veterinary science instruction using the corpses of animals killed specifically for dissection for anatomy lessons, Maharashtra Animal & Fishery Sciences University (MAFSU) is phasing out the cruel practice. In a letter sent to its various colleges throughout the state, MAFSU wrote, "Replacing live animals with advanced technology is not only humane but also a legal requirement as per Chapter IV of The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960". 

    In addition, the university – in association with PETA and InterNICHE – is organising a national workshop to familiarise anatomy and surgery department faculty from veterinary colleges all over India with humane methods of educating students, such as obtaining cadavers ethically and using models and computer simulation programmes.

    The keynote speakers at the 6 June 2013 workshop at Bombay Veterinary College include Professor AK Misra, the vice chancellor of MAFSU; Lt Gen (Retd) Dr Narayan Mohanty, the president of the Veterinary Council of India; and Maj Gen (Retd) Dr RM Kharb, Chair of the Animal Welfare Board of India. Professor MSA Kumar from Tufts University and Nick Jukes from InterNICHE  will be the lead facilitators.  

    More than 70 delegates from the surgery and anatomy departments of 37 veterinary colleges in India will attend the workshop including faculty from Andhra Pradesh, Assam, Bihar, Chattishgarh, Gujarat, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir, Jharkhand, Karnataka, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Mizoram, Orissa, Puducherry, Punjab, Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu, Uttarakhand, Utter Pradesh and West Bengal.

    Every year, an estimated 1,000 calves are killed in India to teach veterinary anatomy and surgery to students, and thousands of frogs, rats, guinea pigs and rabbits suffer and die in college laboratories. Nearly every published comparative study in science-education literature has concluded that non-animal methods – including computer simulations, interactive CD-ROMs, films, charts and lifelike models – teach anatomy and complex biological processes as well as or better than inhumane and archaic animal laboratories.

    You can help. Contact PETA to report cruelty to animals at your university or college by writing to info@petaindia.org. 

  • Jet Airways Won't Ship Animals to Labs

    Written by PETA

    Jet Airways, India's second-largest airline, has assured PETA India in writing that it does not and will not transport animals to laboratories for use in experiments. In a reply to PETA's letter inquiring about Jet Airways' policy regarding shipments of animals to laboratories, Mohammad Ali El Ariss, the airlines' vice president of cargo, stated, "We would like to inform you, we refuse to carry live animals for laboratory experiments".

    "Jet Airways is now among the enlightened airlines that refuse to transport dogs, cats, primates and other animals to laboratories, where they would suffer and die", says PETA India Science Policy Adviser Dr Chaitanya Koduri. "Jet Airways has set an example for the dwindling number of airlines – including Air India – that still profit from animal suffering to follow."

    Numerous major airlines have full or partial policies against transporting animals for experimentation. Just among the International Air Transportation Association's list of the world's 10 largest cargo carriers, FedEx, UPS, Cathay Pacific, Korean Airlines and EVA Air prohibit any shipments of animals for experiments; Emirates, Singapore Airlines and China Airlines won't ship primates to laboratories; and Lufthansa has banned shipments of cats, dogs and primates destined for laboratories. One of the exceptions is Air India, which, despite repeated assurances to PETA that it would not transport animals for use in experiments, has backtracked on its pledge and continues to profit from the cruel trade of shipping animals to laboratories.

    Please join us in urging Air India to stop transporting animals to laboratories for experimentation. Take action now!

  • Joker Supports PETA

    Written by PETA

    What if aliens experimented on humans?

    The cast and crew of Farah Khan's Joker, directed by Shirish Kunder and starring Akshay Kumar, Sonakshi Sinha and Chitrangda Singh, have joined PETA to encourage filmgoers to ponder this question and participate in our campaign to urge the government to ban cosmetic testing on animals. Chitrangda posed on behalf of PETA and Joker with the aliens from the film for the campaign. The ad is shot by ace photographer Atul Kasbekar, make up and hair styling by Mehak Oberoi and digital imaging by Prashish More. See what she has to say about why animals should not be used for testing cosmetics.


     

    You can help. Take action now. 

  • Higher Ed Animal Use for Trainings Banned

    Written by PETA

    Animals in university, medical and pharmacy school laboratories and classrooms – and those of us who care about them – have reason for celebration. Following an extensive campaign by PETA India, forward-thinking scientists and other caring people, the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) has issued guidelines to the Medical Council of India (MCI), Pharmacy Council of India (PCI) and University Grants Commission (UGC) to completely stop dissection and experimentation on animals for training both undergraduate and post-graduate students and to use non-animal methods of teaching instead!

    This victory was hard fought. In addition to writing letters to all the entities mentioned above, our efforts included gathering petition signatures from university students, progressive scientists and other caring individuals; celebrity involvement; media coverage and online action by you! 

    Also key to this victory was our engagement with the scientific community. In September, the Indian National Science Academy organised a brainstorming session in which scientists from all corners of India were invited to discuss the use of animals in education and research. PETA India was the only organisation that was given a chance to be a part of the discussion panel. We shared the information on available alternatives, gave examples of how medical schools in the US and the UK phased out the use of animals in their curricula and submitted a dossier of non-animal alternatives to the president of the MCI. As a first step in the victory, the UGC website published guidelines for phasing out dissection of animals in life-sciences courses.

    In January, PETA India sponsored a series of free workshops on alternatives to the use of animals in bachelor of medicine and bachelor of surgery (MBBS) programmes, which allowed us to reach nearly 500 medical teachers from 120 medical schools across India, many of whom decided to change to non-animal methods of instruction. Then, in February, we submitted a dossier of alternatives to use of animals in pharmacy education to the president of the PCI, who immediately informed us that they would begin the process of removing animals from pharmacy education and invited us to a brainstorming session with officials from the UGC and the PCI.

    Finally, MoEF agreed with PETA that animal experiments should be avoided when alternatives are available, according to section 17(d) of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960. These new guidelines constitute a ban to which all the schools should strictly adhere.

    This is an important win, but many animals continue to suffer and die in commercial laboratories. You can help them by urging the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare to implement a complete ban on testing cosmetics on animals.

  • Dia Mirza Is a Bunny's Honey

    Written by Kriti-S

    We all know that former Miss Earth and Bollywood leading lady Dia Mirza has always promoted many social causes. Now she can add "animal ally" to her résumé. This gorgeous star and animal lover is the new brand ambassador of Body Shop, a company that doesn't test on animals.

    Rats, mice, guinea pigs, rabbits and other animals used in cruel animal tests are forced to swallow or inhale massive quantities of a test substance or endure the pain of having caustic chemicals applied to their sensitive eyes and skin – even though the results of animal tests are often unreliable or not applicable to humans.

    Kudos to Dia for supporting cruelty-free beauty! Please join her by taking the pledge never to buy or use any product that is tested on animals

     

  • PETA Members Caged to Protest AIIMS Cruelty

    Written by Kriti-S

    The heat of Delhi could not bring down the spirits of our passionate activists who locked themselves in metal cages to protest the imprisonment of animals at AIIMS. AIIMS is supposed to be a premier medical training institution, but it's showing how it is number one in cruelty to animals.

    Laboratories in India are generally required to rehabilitate animals after three years of use, yet many of the monkeys at AIIMS have been languishing in cramped, rusty cages for up to a decade, and one monkey has been there for nearly 20 years.

    After watching the undercover footage of AIIMS' Central Animal Facility, celebrities like Pamela Anderson and Celina Jaitly have also called on the institution to at least let the monkeys who have been jailed there the longest go to a real rehabilitation centre where they can climb trees and feel the grass under their feet and the warmth of the sun on their backs for the first time.

    Now, it's your turn to help us free these animals. Take action here

  • PETA to Vet College: Stop Killing Animals

    Written by PETA


    When PETA received word from distressed students at Veterinary College–Bangalore that four calves had been killed and embalmed for anatomy lessons and that more may still be killed, we sprang into action.

    Dr Manilal Valliyate, the head of PETA India Veterinary Affairs, fired off a letter to the Vice Chancellor of Karnataka Veterinary, Animal and Fisheries Sciences University (of which Veterinary College–Bangalore is a part) urging the university to switch to humane, non-animal training methods.

    During calf-embalming exercises – which are common in schools throughout India – the animals are often killed by having their jugular vein and carotid artery cut. The calves slowly and painfully bleed to death. Chemicals are then injected into the bodies to preserve them.

    Most people who pursue a veterinary career do so because they want to care for and help animals. So why are some schools still forcing students to participate in lessons that involve the killing of animals when non-animal teaching methods are readily available?

     Please join Dr Valliyate and the caring students at Veterinary College–Bangalore by speaking out against animal dissection. If you do not want to dissect and need PETA's help in encouraging your institution to implement modern methods, please contact us at Info@petaindia.org.

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