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  • Victoria Horse Confiscated by PETA

    Written by PETA

    On 23 January 2013, a Victoria horse whose owner had an expired license but who had recently been given a health certificate stating he was ‘fit’ by the Maharashtra animal husbandry department was confiscated by PETA, the police and an Animal Welfare Officer (AWO) who was on the scene.

    Dr Manilal Valliyate, director of veterinary affairs for PETA India, reports that the horse has cracks on the hooves on all four legs, indicative of poor shoeing techniques. A horse with damaged hoof walls is prone to laminitis (inflammation of sensitive laminae inside the hoof), which can lead to lameness. Poor shoeing is also a violation of the farriery rules under Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (PCA) Act, 1960. The horse also has a wound on the lateral side of his right hock and loss of hair on his withers, caused by brushing of the saddle, and also suffers from tenosynovitis (inflammation of the tendons and ligaments) of the hind legs. Forcing an animal to work in these conditions is an offense of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960.

    Recently, during the High Court of Bombay proceedings regarding the case in which NGOs including PETA are calling for a ban on cruel Victoria carriages in the city, it was revealed that now only 18 Victoria drivers carry licenses to ply, while all others are completely illegal. The counsel for the traffic commissioner informed the court that a total of 53 applications for licenses were received, out of which 35 were outright rejected on the basis of offences against the carriage drivers, horses who weren't fit, cruelty to animals, overloading and other illegalities.

    PETA questions the certificates issued to the 18 horses who have been given licenses to ply since equine experts have explained forcing horses to haul carriages on the city's streets is inherently cruel, as it often results in permanent leg damage, collapses and traffic accidents. PETA is calling on authorities to confiscate all Victoria horses immediately for drivers who have not been issued licenses to help ensure the safety of people and the welfare of horses while continuing to ask for a total ban on the cruel trade.

    "A business based on the abuse of animals can never be regulated into legitimacy", says Dr Valliyate. "Delhi has banned cruel and dangerous horse-drawn carriages, and Mumbai must do the same."

    You can help ban Mumbai's horse carriages by taking action here.

  • Most Victoria Carriages Illegal

    Written by PETA

    During the recent High Court of Bombay proceedings regarding the case in which non-profit organisations, including PETA, are calling for a ban on cruel Victoria carriages in the city, it was revealed that now only 18 Victoria drivers carry licenses to ply, while all others are completely illegal. The counsel for the traffic commissioner informed the court that a total of 53 applications for licenses were received, out of which 35 were outright rejected on the basis of offences against the carriage drivers, horses who weren't fit, cruelty to animals, overloading and other illegalities.

    On 4 October 2012, the Honourable Court stated, "The Licencing Authority while exercising powers under the provisions of the Bombay Public conveyances Act, 1920 shall take into consideration the provisions of Section 11 and the other provisions of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960 and shall consider whether the places, where the concerned horses are kept, are maintained in hygienic condition or not. As far as, licence to be issued for fitness of horse is concerned, the same shall be considered on the basis of fitness of horses".

    PETA questions the certificates issued to the 18 horses who have been given licenses to ply since equine experts have explained that forcing horses to haul carriages on the city's streets is inherently cruel, as it often results in permanent leg damage, collapses and traffic accidents. PETA calls on authorities to confiscate all Victoria horses immediately for drivers who have not been issued licenses to help ensure the safety of people and the welfare of horses while continuing to ask for a total ban on the cruel trade.

    "A business based on the abuse of animals can never be regulated into legitimacy", says Dr Manilal Valliyate, director of veterinary affairs for PETA India. "Delhi has banned cruel and dangerous horse-drawn carriages, and Mumbai must do the same."

    Poonam Mahajan of People for Animals, one of the other groups intervening in the case, states, "While we welcome the Hon'ble Courts Order, it is inherently cruel to make horses ply on concrete. There is no need to go into individual cases. While we spend hours going into individual cases horses keep having accidents and dying. We need a comprehensive solution like in Delhi. Horses must not be made to suffer on Mumbai's streets a second longer than these wonderful beings already have".

    You can help bring in the ban. Learn how you can help.

  • Bull Suffers Leg Fracture During Jallikattu

    Written by PETA

    Just one day after a bull died from a head-on collision with a moving passenger bus, an inspector authorised by the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI), a statutory body under the Ministry of Environment and Forests, reported that a bull sustained a crippling leg and fetlock joint fracture during the jallikattu event held on Tuesday, 15 January 2013, in Palamedu.

    The terrified bull was being chased by a mob carrying sticks on a narrow road. In an effort to protect himself, the panicked bull jumped more than 10 feet off the road and onto a field.

    No medical aid was supplied to the bull, who sustained a fractured leg, until 90 minutes after the incident, and the help that was eventually provided came only after the AWBI inspector pleaded with the police and other authorities to arrange help.

    The inspector also reported seeing participants beat animals, twist their tailbones and poke them with sickles and knives. He even saw police hit, poke and prod bulls with their lathis.

    Furthermore, the inspector observed organizers forcibly rubbing a bull's nose and eyes with a liquid in order to disorient him.

    PETA is now calling on authorities to ban jallikattu since it puts both animals' and people's lives at risk. You can help stop this.

     

  • Bull Dies During Jallikattu

    Written by PETA

    Inspectors authorised by the Animal Welfare Board of India, a statutory body under the Ministry of Environment and Forests, report that during the jallikattu event held on Monday, 14 January 2013, in Avaniapuram, Madurai, a bull died from a head-on collision with a moving passenger bus because of the absence of a contained collection area for the bulls, which is a violation of the Madurai bench of the Chennai High Court guidelines that are intended to regulate jallikattu.

    Participants forcing fluids, likely liquor, down the bulls' throats.

    The terrified bull ended up in the accident on the main road after running frantically away from jallikattu participants who had been chasing and deliberately agitating him. Other panicked bulls also ran from the jallikattu area onto the main road into the midst of oncoming traffic. The inspectors reported that no veterinarians could be found at the scene of the death and also witnessed cruelties, such as a person biting the tail of a bull, other people poking bulls with knives and twisting their tailbones and organisers poking and beating animals with wooden sticks and forcing fluids, likely liquor, down the bulls' throats.

    Panicked bull ran from the jallikattu area onto the main road into the midst of oncoming traffic.

    Although the Ministry of Environment and Forests issued a notification which banned the use of bulls as performing animals – thereby banning jallikattu – the Tamil Nadu government is supporting and permitting jallikattu to be held throughout the state. Jallikattu supporters claim that the events are being held under High Court and Supreme Court guidelines. However, PETA contends that the guidelines are meaningless because they do not prevent the cruelty to animals inherent during jallikattu or stop participants and spectators from getting hurt. During jallikattu, terrified bulls are chased, kicked, punched, jumped on, dragged to the ground and otherwise tormented – acts that violate the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960.

    Bull died from a head-on collision with a moving passenger during jallikattu.

    PETA is calling on authorities to ban jallikattu since it puts both animals' and people's lives at risk. You can help by taking action here.

  • PETA India Turns 13!

    Written by PETA

    Today is PETA India's 13th birthday! Like all teenagers, we are cool, fun, energetic and outspoken. PETA Youth, PETA's vocal young division, can often be found promoting animal rights at college festivals and concerts, and we love to be active on Twitter and Facebook.

    We're pretty tech-savvy, if we do say so ourselves, using social-networking sites and viral videos like "Glass Walls", narrated by R Madhavan, to make others aware of why they shouldn't eat animals, as well as other important animal rights issues.

    We don't mind being "different" if we can make people think more about serious issues that they'd prefer not to think about. That's why we bodypainted ourselves to urge people to eat "green" by going vegan.

    Our actions might ruffle some feathers sometimes – such as when we urged consumers to choose Jet Airways over Air India since the former has a policy against transporting animals to laboratories while Air India continues to transport animals to their cruel deaths – but we're always going to speak up for what's right.

    We keep tabs on current affairs, too, and even told Kingfisher Airlines that we'd help the company out if it painted our colourful and informative pro-vegan impotence ad on its planes.

    We're crazy about celebrities, as most teenagers are, and many stars are even crazy about us! We've got a long list of A-list celebrity supporters, including Imran Khan, Shahid Kapoor, Kalki Koechlin, Lara Dutta and more. Teens look up to them, and they're great role models.

    Did we mention that we also love sports?

    Most of all, we care about all living beings, including chickens, fish, bulls, sheep, monkeys, mice, elephants and rats. We even teach youngsters to be kind and respectful to animals as well as people.

    So go ahead – enjoy some vegan cake in honour of PETA's 13th birthday.

  • The Dairy Industry: Sanctioned Rape

    Written by PETA

    Mahatma Gandhi said, "The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated."

    We may call cows used for their milk "mothers", but we don't always treat them with respect. Cows used for their milk are among the most abused animals in the country, made to endure rape and the kidnapping of their young before they are murdered. At a time when India is rightly focused on improving the lives of women, let's be sure not to leave our female animal friends behind. As PETA founder Ingrid E Newkirk has said, "When it comes to pain, love, joy, loneliness, and fear, a rat is a pig is a dog is a boy. Each one values his or her life and fights the knife".

    Rape: When a female human is forcibly and involuntarily violated sexually, it's called "rape". When female cows are forcibly and involuntary violated sexually, it's called "artificial insemination". To impregnate a cow – without her consent – a person jams his or her arm far into the cow's rectum in order to locate and position the uterus and then forces an instrument into her vagina. The cow is defenseless to stop it.

    Even those in the dairy industry recognize that cows are victims: the device used to restrain cows for this invasive procedure is called a "rape rack".

    Kidnapping: There is no such thing as a "dairy cow". Like human mothers, cows produce milk to nourish their babies. In the dairy industry, calves are stolen from their mothers immediately after they are born so that the milk meant for them can be consumed by humans. Their mothers cry out in vain, calling to their lost young ones. During PETA's investigation of the Indian dairy industry, we found male calves whose mouths were tied shut with ropes so that they couldn't cry out when they were hungry. These babies are then left to die a slow, agonising death in a corner. Once or twice a week, a haath gaadi wala comes by and picks up the dead bodies and sometimes dying calves and takes them to be skinned for calf leather. Female calves will follow the same doomed path as their mothers and grandmothers.

    Murder: Cows can naturally live up to 18 years, but cows used for dairy production generally only live until their milk production wanes, when they are sent to slaughterhouses to be killed for their meat and skin. They are crammed onto vehicles in such high numbers that many suffocate, are inadvertently gouged by others' horns or die en route. At the slaughterhouse, their throats are hacked at with dull knives. Often, dismembering begins before they lose consciousness.

    Let's work together to end the exploitation of all living beings. One simple but important step that we can take towards creating a kinder society is to leave meat, eggs and dairy products off our plates.

  • The Hottest Vegetarian Celebrities Are …

    Written by PETA

    The votes have been counted, and the judges have completed their deliberations. PETA India's Hottest Vegetarian Celebrities of 2012 are Vidya Balan and Amitabh Bachchan!

    Vidya Balan is known in Bollywood as a "female hero", and we have to agree. This brainy beauty is quick to credit her vegetarian diet with keeping her healthy, and we're quick to credit her with saving hundreds of animal lives. Congratulations are in order for Vidya for another reason, too: she just married Siddharth Roy Kapur last month. We're sure that the wedding reception was full of heavenly vegetarian dishes.

    Vidya is no stranger to sharing the screen with Amitabh Bachchan since the two have starred together in Eklavya: The Royal Guard and Paa – and now the duo is sharing Hottest Vegetarian Celebrity honours. Amitabh's father chose his son's name because it means "the light that will never go off", and Amitabh has certainly lived up to his moniker. As one of the most acclaimed Bollywood stars and one of India's most influential vegetarians, Amitabh is a hero for both humans and other animals.

    Congratulations, Vidya and Amitabh!

    Want to eat like a star? Request a free vegetarian/vegan starter kit packed with everything you need by writing to JalajK@petaindia.org. Don't forget to include your full postal address.

  • Vegan Brunch Recipes for the Weekend

    Written by PETA

    "Doing brunch" is the latest weekend trend, so why not start 2013 off right by inviting your friends to a nice leisurely vegan brunch this Sunday? Here are some easy, ethical, healthy and tasty recipes you can try.

    Baked Oatmeal Squares

    2 cups old-fashioned oats
    1/4–1/2 cup organic brown sugar (depending on how sweet you like your oatmeal)
    2 tsp ground cinnamon
    2 tsp baking powder
    1 tsp salt
    1/2 cup dried cranberries
    1 cup non-dairy milk
    1/2 block silken tofu
    1/2 cup applesauce
    1 tsp vanilla extract

    Toppings: non-dairy milk, sliced bananas, strawberries, peanut or almond butter

    • Preheat the oven to 175ºC.
    • In a large bowl, combine the oats, sugar, cinnamon, baking powder, salt and cranberries.
    • In a blender or food processor, combine the non-dairy milk, tofu, applesauce and vanilla and process until smooth. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and mix well.
    • Spread the mixture into a 20-centimetre-by-20-centimetre pan that has been lightly coated with cooking spray and bake for approximately 40 minutes.
    • Cut into squares and serve with desired toppings.

    Makes 4 servings
    This recipe comes from OneGreenPlanet.org.

    Chickpea Flour Omelette

    1 Tbsp flaxmeal
    1/2 cup warm water
    1 Tbsp oat flour, flax meal or chia seed meal
    1/4 tsp salt
    1/8 tsp black salt (kala namak)
    1/8 tsp garlic powder
    Pinch turmeric
    1/2 tsp baking powder
    1/3 cup chickpea flour (besan)
    1/2 cup mixed vegetables (onions, bell peppers, tomatoes and carrots work well), chopped
    1/2 jalapeño or serrano pepper, finely chopped (or use black pepper or cayenne, to taste)
    1/3 cup chopped spinach or greens, plus more for garnish
    1 tsp nutritional yeast

    • Whisk the flaxmeal and 1/4 cupful of the water in a bowl and set aside for 5 minutes.
    • Add the oat flour, salt, black salt, garlic powder, turmeric and remaining water and mix well.
    • In a separate bowl, combine the baking powder and chickpea flour and mix well. Add the flaxmeal mixture and whisk for half a minute.
    • Add the mixed vegetables, jalapeño, spinach and nutritional yeast and fold in well.
    • Grease a non-stick pan and heat to medium.
    • Drop the batter on the hot pan and tap once or twice to spread. Cover with a lid and cook for 6 to 7 minutes.
    • Remove the lid, add a few drops of oil on the edges and cook for another 5 to 7 minutes.
    • Flip and cook for 5 to 6 more minutes.
    • Add more greens and the non-dairy cheese, fold and remove from heat.

    Serve with ketchup, toast and hash browns.

    Makes one large or two small omelettes

    This recipe comes from Sharan-India.org.

    Tofu Scramble

    3 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
    1/2 cup minced onion
    3 Tbsp diced red bell peppers
    1/2 cup chopped mushrooms
    300 g firm tofu, drained and crumbled
    1/2 tsp turmeric
    1/2 tsp salt
    1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
    1 Tbsp fresh chopped parsley

    • Sauté the garlic, onions and bell peppers on medium heat for about 2 minutes. Add the mushrooms and stir.
    • Add the crumbled tofu, turmeric, salt and pepper and stir well. Garnish with the parsley.

    Makes 4 servings
    This recipe comes from HomeCookingAdventure.com.

    Baked Potato Wedges

    4 medium potatoes, washed and cut into wedges
    1 tsp paprika
    1/4 tsp chilli powder (optional)
    1/4 tsp garlic powder (optional)
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
    3 Tbsp oil
    Green onions, chopped (for garnish)

    • Preheat the oven to 220°C.
    • Place the potato wedges in a large bowl. Add the paprika, chilli powder, garlic powder, salt, pepper and oil and toss gently to coat.
    • Lay the wedges in a single layer on a greased baking tray.
    • Bake until golden brown and crispy on the outside, about 25 to 30 minutes.

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    Makes 4 servings

    You'll find more great vegan recipes here and here. And to give animals plenty of reasons to celebrate in 2013, get your free vegetarian/vegan starter kit from PETA India by writing to JalajK@petaindia.org along with your address and contact details.

     

     

     

     

    ·         Preheat the oven to 220°C.

    ·         Place the potato wedges in a large bowl. Add the paprika, chilli powder, garlic powder, salt, pepper and oil and toss gently to coat.

    ·         Lay the wedges in a single layer on a greased baking tray.

    Bake until golden brown and crispy on the outside, about 25 to 30 minutes.

    Makes 4 servings

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  • 2012: A Victorious Year for Animals

    Written by PETA

    The year 2012 was filled with so many victories and achievements for animals, it's not possible to list them all in one blog. Here are just a few of the highlights:

    • Using footage shot by undercover investigators, PETA India released "Glass Walls", the first-ever exposé showing the routine cruelty of the Indian meat, egg and dairy industries. R Madhavan narrated the powerful video, which got its name from legendary animal advocate Paul McCartney's famous quote, "If slaughterhouses had glass walls, everyone would be vegetarian".
    • An animal supplier in China duped Cathay Pacific Airways into transporting 70 beagles to India for use in experiments by a pharmaceutical company in Bangalore, against the airline's policy of not flying animals to laboratories. But PETA India, other rescue groups and MP Maneka Gandhi were wise to the ruse, and when we told you about it, 50,000 of you demanded that the dogs be released from the laboratory. Authorities listened to your pleas, and the beagles were rescued and placed up for adoption.

    • Jet Airways, India's second largest airline, joined Cathay Pacific and numerous other major airlines in agreeing never to transport animals for use in experiments.
    • PETA India snagged the Lush cosmetics company's first-ever global Lush Prize for our lobbying efforts to end cosmetics testing on animals. We worked to have the Bureau of Indian Standards accept non-animal testing methods and continued to push the Indian Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to ban animal tests for cosmetics.
    • After years of pressure, the Election Commission of India issued a statement advising all political parties and candidates to refrain from using animals in campaigns. Animals used in campaigns are often overloaded, beaten and shoved into terrifying crowds.
    • Millions of children will learn how to respect animals and peacefully coexist with them now that the Central Board of Secondary Education endorsed our humane education programme, Compassionate Citizen, on its official website. The Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) also agreed to endorse and promote Compassionate Citizen.
    • PETA also worked with AWBI to successfully encourage the government agency to classify the common crushing method of castrating bulls as a violation of The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960. The AWBI states that all bulls must now be castrated under anaesthesia by a veterinarian.
    • Shoppers will have an easy time finding vegan restaurants, grocery stores, clothing and personal-care products, thanks to PETA India's new list of companies that don't test on animals, our easy-to-identify "PETA-Approved" logo and our vegan logo for restaurants.
    • The Central Warehousing Corporation saved countless animal lives when it agreed to stop poisoning and suffocating rats in order to test its airplane-cabin fumigation process. The company now uses non-animal methods.
    • PETA India's young division, PETA Youth, reached thousands more socially conscious young people with information about cruelty to animals and animal rights by partnering with Submerge, Sunburn, Nokia Indiafest and more than 130 college events.
    • The sight of bullocks being forced to toil under heavy yokes in the hot sun while hauling sugarcane may soon be a thing of the past, thanks to a groundbreaking new initiative from PETA India's friends at Animal Rahat. The organisation is successfully persuading sugarcane factories to switch to tractors, saving hundreds of bulls from suffering.
    • After a five-year campaign by PETA India, the Ministry of Food and Civil Supplies' Controller of Rationing ordered oil companies to replace bullock carts with auto rickshaws, saving bullocks from having to pull carts loaded with kerosene on the congested streets of Mumbai.
    • Even more bulls were spared when PETA and Animal Rahat worked with authorities to stop plans for a series of illegal bullfights and bull races.
    • To help schools that offer medical courses adopt new non-animal training methods, we sponsored a series of free workshops that introduced instructors to modern, superior educational tools, such as human-patient simulators and interactive computer-aided teaching models.
    • Animal advocacy became the hot new style when PETA India teamed up with the Fashion Design Council of India for a "Fashion for Freedom – Boycott Zoos" event during Fashion Week. The star-studded event reached thousands of people with the message that exotic animals belong in the wild – not in cages.

    Thank you for everything you did for animals in 2012. We look forward to sharing many more victories with you in 2013.

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